Poster & Repository stack plus other stacks


#1

I have a few educational pages about drumming on my site, some of them in a Workshop section that is difficult to expand and some others in a classic RW blog format that isn’t satisfactory.
I would like to reunite these pages, and It looks like the Poster stack would be perfect for what I want to do.

Just before I buy, I want to make sure that I can have two blogs inside the same site, one in English and one in French.

Also I have read that people use Poster with the Repository stack as well, and it looks like it would be almost mandatory.
I use Transmit for FTP, but it looks like Repository would be more practical, can you confirm?

Since I will deal with both images and mp3 files, I guess I can also warehouse mp3 files like I would do for images, am I right?
Then it looks like I could use Repository to share links to files that are on the server, as well.

If I take the Instacks bundle, I’m not sure I would use all of the stacks in it, but I guess I would use Redirect at least. I just learned how to make redirections in the ht.access file, but I guess Redirect will help me doing this in a more practical way, right?


(Jannis from inStacks Software) #2

Yes, that’s possible. They just have to be located on two different pages (inside the same project / site).

Poster Stack allows “offline blogging” with Stacks content, or “online bloggging” with markdown text files located on your server.

Repository Stack is not mandatory for the second part. It brings with it a text editor with markdown highlighting.

Yes, sure.

Yes, there is a “copy URL to clipboard” inside Repository Stack so that sharing files becomes easier.

Also have a look at Gallery Stack, that’s a pretty known and often used stack.

Redirect Stack is for the ones who don’t like to or don’t know how to edit htaccess files. If you already know what to do in htaccess, you are good to go.


#3

Thanks Jannis, yes the Gallery stack looks cool, I should start taking more and better pictures :wink:

I’ve noticed a broken link on the Remote Image Stack page’s “Demo Page” button!


#4

I bought your stacks bundle yesterday and I’m happy with my experience, so far!
I have a question.
After I learned how to make redirections in the htaccess file, I erased some old folders on the server. Then I noticed that the redirections didn’t work anymore.
I put the folders back, and the redirections work again.
Is it normal behavior? Do I have to keep the old folders and files on the server for the redirections to work?


(Jannis from inStacks Software) #5

Hi, thanks for your purchase!

I am reading that you perform redirects via htaccess, so not with the Redirect Stack, correct?

If you perform redirect with the Stack, sure, the old pages must exist on the server. This should not be the case with htaccess.

Cheers, Jannis


#6

I’m talking about redirections I had made before I had the Redirect Stack (which I didn’t try to use yet). So…
What strategy would you suggest? I have a RW blog that’s in a folder called “blog”, and I have started to make the new blog with the Poster stack. I planned to place the new blog in the same location/folder on the server. But if I have to keep the old files in the same locations, having the old and the new files in the same folder may be a mess.
Would you use a folder with a new folder name for the Poster blog, or would you rename the old one?


(Doug Bennett) #7

You might want to give us some examples of what redirects you have in the htaccess file. Along with some URLs.

If you have a redirect in an htaccess file the “old” address(the one you are redirecting from) doesn’t need to exist anymore. The address you are redirecting to needs to be there or you should get a 404 error. Most blogs URL’s include a query string in the address so rewrite rules can be a bit tricky.

I wouldn’t think you would want the new poster blog to be in the same folder as old blog. Are you planning on converting the old blog post into poster or just using poster for new post?


#8

An example is this page which was previously:
https://www.timemanipulation.com/en/drumbooks/
and that I renamed in


Here’s what I wrote on the .htaccess file:
Redirect 301 /http://www.timemanipulation.com/en/drumbooks/ http://www.timemanipulation.com/en/drum-books-by-alain-rieder/


#9

I plan to replace the old blog with the new one, and that’s why I had the idea I would place it in a folder having the same name.
Since the old blog is rather small, I also plan to reconstruct all or some of the old posts inside the new one.
So, my idea is also to redirect some of the permalinks in the htaccess file, maybe using the Redirect stack.


(Jannis from inStacks Software) #10

If the new blog is in the same folder than the old, you should use htaccess.


(Doug Bennett) #11

Okay,
Don’t know how you posted this did you copy it directly from the htaccess file?
The way it appears I don’t think it would work You have an extra / before right after the 301 before the http://. The example pages you listed the links for are https:// Not http://.

Usually, you wouldn’t enter the entire absolute URL for the old page but just the relative path so something like this would work if you have the htaccess file in the root directory:

Redirect 301 /en/drumbooks/ https://www.timemanipulation.com/en/drum-books-by-alain-rieder/

An .htaccess file can be placed in any directory on the server. The directives (rules) would apply from the directory down the hierarchy to any subdirectory. Relative paths are specified based on the location of the htaccess file.

Where was the htaccess file with the redirects located? Was it at the root level directory? If it was removing any subdirectories(folders) shouldn’t have had any effect on the redirects working.

The Redirect stack and using the redirect or modrewrite rules in the htaccess file are two completely separate ways to do redirects. Redirect stack requires you to leave the old page in the same place named the same and htaccess files don’t.


#12

What would you do yourself Jannis? Now I tend to think it would be better to choose a new name for the new folder, do you agree?


#13

Yes I did copy it from the htaccess file, and I have no idea why there was an extra slash, I don’t remember seeing this before, and all the redirections had an extra slash. I removed them.

Right, that’s because I installed an SSL certificate on my site for the first time this afternoon!


#14

[quote=“teefers, post:11, topic:26748”]
Usually, you wouldn’t enter the entire absolute URL for the old page but just the relative path so something like this would work if you have the htaccess file in the root directory:

Redirect 301 /en/drumbooks/ https://www.timemanipulation.com/en/drum-books-by-alain-rieder/
```[/quote]

OK I will try this

#15

Yes, I have accessed the htaccess file from Rapidweaver, and I think it is at the root directory.
There is a second one called “.htaccess-premove”, maybe is it there because my site was moved from one server to another, yesterday!?

Like I said, I think it is at the root directory. Maybe the redirections stopped working because of the extra slashes. I will test this !

As I haven’t tried this stack yet, I have no idea how it works, I bought the bundle just yesterday. If I can avoid to leave old files on the server, I would prefer.

Thanks for the help, I do appreciate!


#16

I have shortened the absolute URL to the relative path, and I changed http to https.
Redirections still work, but they still don’t if I remove the old folder.


#17

I found out that I had to add “/web” as in this example:

Redirect 301 /web/en/drumbooks/

It seems to be working that way, but I have to double-check some links that still have a strange behavior.