Buying add-ons vs. Pay Pal


(Michael Lever) #1

Developers that use Pay Pal for processing transactions may not be aware of this but if the customer doesn’t have a Pay Pal account (as I don’t) then the customer can only transact as a guest for to 10 occasions. After that, Pay Pal won’t let you transact unless you open a Pay Pal account. I’ve exceeded 10 but I don’t want to have a Pay Pal account so much as I’d like to buy a stack from Cosculture that’s not going to be possible unless i concede.

By not conceding, I agree I’m losing out but it’s a matter of principle so I see no reason to compromise. In the meantime, add-on developers are losing out.

I’ve contacted Cosculture and suggested they use Paddle or another merchant.


(Rob D) #2

So, by posting this, you just wanted to manifest your disdain for PayPal, or you are going to tell us what is the reason behind all that? :wink:


(Michael Lever) #3

We on-line e-commerce customers are urged by cyber-security experts to keep our credit card details secure. Which to my way of thinking means not giving out details to be stored on-line for the sake of it. Frequently, I get spam purportedly from PayPal which doesn’t fill me with confidence. Having had my cards blocked (as a precaution by. the card provider) on a few occasions in the last couple of years, including an intercede on Amazon), it’s not disdain for Paypal as such but PP’s requirement that if I want to use its services I have to have an account with them. Fair enough so far as PP is concerned, but it’s not my decision/choice to use PP, but that of the seller.

In my opinion, PP’s requirement does a disservice to app developers and in fact any other business that uses PayPal.


(Rob D) #4

Fair enough, but how do you expect to do any on-line transaction without giving away your credit card number or account number?

In my humble opinion, using PayPal service gives you an additional “layer” of security, because you don’t have to reveal your vital financial details to each and every entity you are doing business with. Am I naive? Or am I misunderstanding your problem?


(Michael Lever) #5

I have been buying on-line for years. It’s the difference between card details permanently stored on a site, and entering details for each transaction. I prefer the former.


(Rob D) #7

Well, we could continue this argument 'till the cows come home, but I don’t think this was your intention. I hope some other people will give you the advice you were looking for…


(Doug Bennett) #8

Michael,
I agree with you 100% on any on-line seller is being foolish not to offer more than just PayPal.
I have a PayPal account but prefer not to use it. My credit cards are protected from any fraud on their own. If you have ever tried to use PayPal for disputing a charge good luck.


(Rob D) #9

I have – once. And it was very fast, efficient and courteous on the PayPal’s side.

If you want to be more assured of the security of your credit card details stored at PayPal, just change your password regularly. This is more efficient than changing password at all the different merchants that you deal with.


(Doug Bennett) #11

Steve,
In the US Credit cards like Visa and M/C are issued by US banks. They are in fact heavily regulated. I have several times had fraud attempted on US issued cards and simply contacted my bank and got complete credit applied while I was on the phone.
I had one problem with Paypal and after several emails back and forth they could not resolve it. I contacted the bank and again got it resolved on the phone.

It may not be the same in other countries, but for me I use Paypal only if that is the only payment option offered.

The point I was making is a good retailer should offer the consumer as many choices to pay as possible. You may be loosing sales if someone is not comfortable with your payment option.


(Dave Lord) #13

I found this statement very odd. There aren’t too many businesses that won’t have this requirement, especially in the financial sector. I think Paypal is generous in giving you 10 transactions before requiring you to join.


(Michael Lever) #14

“if I want to use its services I have to have an account with them”

A difference exists between my wanting to use its services of my own volition and the seller of product/goods (in this case an app developer) insisting I use PP to pay for a purchase from that seller.

PP imposing a limitation on the number of times someone can use PP without having a PP account does disservice to the seller.

I expect this is not going to be an isolated incident. Frequently for on-line purchases PP is the only intermediary for paying a seller.