RAPIDWORLD - Calling on all Rapidgeeks


(Andreas Belivanakis) #1

RAPIDWORLD
Calling on all Rapidgeeks

In the footsteps of MacWorld, here comes RapidWorld!

It is time for Rapidweaver to have its own annual conference. Rapidweaver users, developers and Realmac staff can come together for a week-long geek fest in combination with a greek island vacation. Best time would be end of May or September. Proposed destination: The Island of Colors, Milos Island, Greece.

We can have seminars, hand-on workshops, and presentations of themes, stacks and add-ons for all kinds of users: beginners, intermediate and advanced. In addition, participants can enjoy sightseeing, magnificent landscapes, sailing excursions, organized historic and museum bus tours, taste incredible food and local delicacies, view romantic sunsets, and even sunbathe and swim in crystal-clear Aegean waters. That would be more fun that [Rapidgeek] humans are allowed!

How does this sound? This is not a formal announcement. It is meant to gauge interest from the Rapidweaver community. If enough people express interest, this conference can materialize.

So, let’s hear it from all Rapidgeeks. :slight_smile:


(Aaron Marquez) #2

This has been proposed many a times, great idea! Many people have hosted meet ups, but something that seemed to have went well (I wasn’t able to make it) was the online RapidWeaver Conference: https://rapidweaverconference.com

Hopefully Joe W. and the other awesome devs do it again so folks like me can make it!


(Robert Ziebol 🖖🏼) #4

Joe is going to make this an annual thing, but I do know he wants to switch it over to the summer this year. No dates yet, but you can still get access to the videos. Follow the link @Aaron provides.


(Ann Doneen) #5

This sounds like so much fun! I want to say “Count me in!” Hope I can make it happen!
How expensive is it (all transportation considerations aside)? And what airport(s) would be close?


(Andreas Belivanakis) #6

Steve, they don’t have to, as long as it is made optional. :slight_smile:


(Andreas Belivanakis) #7

Ann, if this thing flies, then more details will be given.

Normally, people fly in to Athens first, then take a 40-minute flight from there to Milos Airport, or catch a 3-5 hour ferry to the island.

In May or September, Milos is very affordable, with hotel rates starting at €25/night.

Andreas


(Ann Doneen) #8

Love it!!! Sounds fabulous!


(Konstantijn Van Calster) #10

Sounds as a good idea.
Depends on my agenda I would love to attend this conference.

NB.
Jeroen of Marathia Web Design live there (Zakynthos, Greece).


(Andreas Belivanakis) #11

If this thing flies, I won’t be the organizer. We’ll offload it to a qualified travel agent. I could help initiate everything, but that’s the extend of my involvement.


(Andreas Belivanakis) #13

Usually, the attendees pay for participating in conferences. Have you got a better idea? :slight_smile:


(Andreas Belivanakis) #15

Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha! Good one, Steve. :slight_smile:


(Andreas Belivanakis) #17

My original post, apparently, and specifically this paragraph:

This is not a formal announcement. It is meant to gauge interest from the Rapidweaver community.

I did not extend an invitation to anyone, anywhere. I am sorry for the misunderstanding.


(Ann Doneen) #21

Damn. If you already have “enough women and alcohol to go around,” guess I shouldn’t make reservations… oh, well…


(Andreas Belivanakis) #22

You can never have enough women. :slight_smile:

BTW, I never thought that quoting Jeroen Dijsselbloem would be deemed offensive to the “community”. Snowflakes much?


(Ann Doneen) #23

Is it offensive to someone? I didn’t see anyone complaining online here.

– If you took my comment as a complaint, it wasn’t really meant to be. Only the observation that if you have enough women, then you have enough already and don’t need or necessarily want any more.

ha, ha. . . . But possibly you have managed to extricate yourself from this place between a rock and a hard place… :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:

What does “Snowflakes much?” mean? I apologize for being obtuse, and your English is just about perfect, but that phrase doesn’t really translate. I speak Spanish and French, if that helps.


(Andreas Belivanakis) #24

No dear, your post was fine. A post of mine, however, was hidden because it was flagged:

Your post was flagged by the community. Please see your messages.

The term “snowflake” has been used to mean that special [needs?] someone who is offended by everything and everyone. A snowflake would be offended if there was nothing to be offended about.
:slight_smile:


(Ann Doneen) #25

Well . . . Uh oh.

I am not used to being called “Dear.” These days, that is inappropriate here. It is really considered to be inappropriate familiarity – especially if you have not even met a person (man or woman) and it also is somewhat patronizing. I will attribute it to a difference in cultures rather than any intention to offend. So, now you know. I think you were trying to be nice. But this type of language is not really appreciated where I live. It is considered a bit of a put down rather than a gesture of kindness.

0------

Just read your last post. I am not a snowflake. I do try to understand various international cultures when I travel and speak with people from other parts of the world. And I assume that people elsewhere will do the same. When I was learning Spanish, as a teenager, I was speaking with a young man from Mexico and he said something that made me feel embarrassed. I told him, “Estoy muy embarrasada,” thinking that, as one often can do with a number of English words, I could easily transform it to a Spanish equivalent. However, such was not the case. Unfortunately I accidentally had told him “I am very pregnant.” Now that WAS quite embarrassing. I was glad to be corrected.


(Andreas Belivanakis) #26

Oops! I am sorry. Never meant any offense, of course.

But in what part of the world is the endearing term “dear” considered inappropriate?
:slight_smile:


(Ann Doneen) #27

I am in Malibu, California. It is considered “talking down to a woman,” or diminishing the significance or importance of the woman – UNLESS you know each other really well and the woman is your girlfriend or your wife. It is as if a stranger were calling a woman “Sweetheart,” or “Honey.” When you don’t know someone, you don’t do that here. Unless you are teasing the woman and intentionally trying to provoke her to anger by being rather macho and high-handed. You would not want another man calling you “Dear,” or “Honey.” Same thing, pretty much. That kind of language when men were talking to women was commonplace here in the 1950s, but not anymore. Women rarely initiated that kind of talk with a man – UNLESS – they were that type of CHARACTER who called EVERYBODY “Darling, or Dear.” Some flamboyant women, or very maternal women (maybe like Dolly Parton) get away with it. If a boyfriend calls me “Sweetie,” etc., that’s fine. I accept your apology, thanks. It might be different in Latin countries. I don’t know. Or, possibly some very old-fashioned people in very small towns in Arkansas or the Deep South might not mind so much. But I would be willing to bet that even they would bristle. It implies a certain inequality among the sexes which is not enjoyed by most women I know. You can do it as a joke, but it has to really be understood to be a joke. And international joking like that is not easy to do because the written language is so very different than the spoken tongue. We actually have two different languages: Written and spoken English. It strikes me that because you command of the language is so good, you already should know these things …


(Andreas Belivanakis) #28

California, United States of America. Wow. I’d have never guessed.

I lived in the USA for about 20 years. I am a naturalized U.S. citizen. I also went to college in the U.S. and received a university degree in Bus. Admin. One of the courses I took was Business Communications. In that course, and in the 30 years that followed, in business letters I have been using what I was taught. Practically every business correspondence starts with “Dear Mr.” or “Dear Ms.”

Have things changed that much in the U.S. since I last lived there (17 years ago) that my business communication skills are now obsolete?